Serving the Denver Metro Area
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With April 15th just around the corner, many of us are feeling that annual anxiety linked to tax preparation. Typically, it starts sneaking up amid all the hustle and bustle of the holidays. By the time the holidays pass, many of us are 10 pounds heavier but our wallets are 10 pounds lighter. Instead of beginning the New Year with stress-free sensations of peace and plenty, we’re stressed and strategizing ways to pay back holiday bills and to pay for what we owe for taxes and their preparation. If you find yourself among this group, Gone for Good wants to remind you that you still have the opportunity to maximize your refund before the 2016 tax deadline. You can do this by asking your tax consultant to apply deductions from donations you made throughout the previous year. Donations include monetary contributions as well as tangible goods you gave away. However, if you don’t do some leg-work in regard to your drop -offs, you may not be strategically aligned for the best refund outcome.

Detailed-tracking ensures you get the most value for your drop-off. Turbo Tax provides detailed-tracking thorough “It’s Deductible Online” (www.itsdeductible.com). This feature serves as a resource in the following ways:

• Based on the style and condition of non-cash donations, they assign a re-sale value to each item. Additionally, these values are assigned under IRS guidelines. Known as Fair Market Values, they ensure charitable donations are evaluated correctly and in a way that lowers the risk of tax auditing.
o According to the IRS, “you can no take a deduction for clothing donated after August 17, 2006, unless it is in good condition or better. An item of clothing that is not in good used condition or better for which you take a deduction of more than $500 dollars requires a qualified appraisal. Visit http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p561.pdf for additional information on IRS guidelines.
• You can continuously input and save information on their site throughout the year, so you don’t lose track of your donations and can essentially see how your savings are adding up.

If you choose not to use a resource like the one mentioned above, consider utilizing your own spreadsheet throughout the year. Gone for Good provides a great template for this. When you request our services, you can look forward to receiving a detailed spreadsheet at the end of our process. It clearly displays which items we sold for you and which items we donated. You’ll also get a check back for 30% of profits acquired from your items. This documentation shows the amount you are getting back and help in maximizing your refund. At the end of year, you can supply our spreadsheet, along with any additions you made throughout the year, to a tax consultant. Gone for Good recommends utilizing United Tax Service, Inc. (303-667-6545) http://unitedtaxhelp.com/

United Tax Service, Inc.

United Tax Service, Inc.

They’ll do the work required in matching your items with values designated by the IRS. In the end, you can take credit for your refund outcome, because you were savvy enough to track your items and their corresponding values.

Here at Gone for Good we run into companies and homes that are getting rid of old desks and electronics.  We can search on the Internet and find the correct way to recycle our e-waste.  It gets a little more difficult when trying to find a better home for that beat up old desk.  Enter furniture recycle and you will find charities asking for gently used furniture.  At this point, you are not sure if you can give away your desk.  Enter wood recycle and you only find some recycle centers that will accept tree branches.  Post a free sign on the desk in your driveway and soon you will be receiving some phone calls from unhappy neighbors.

Recycle this old desk

Recycle this old desk

Clutter

 

Clutter.  The dreaded “C” word.  It’s something that we all have had to deal with at one point or another over the course of our lives.  While most of us are fortunate enough to be upwardly mobile enough to be able to purchase stuff (in some cases, lots and lots of stuff!), oftentimes we don’t notice how much stuff we are actually accumulating until a change arises which forces us to jettison some of that stuff: moving, spring cleaning, etc.  

 

It’s nice to have and keep stuff.  A lot of it either serves a practical purpose in our daily lives, or has some sort of sentimental value attached to it.  But that doesn’t apply to everything.  A lot of it is just clutter.  And after doing a bit of research, we’re here to tell you that clutter isn’t necessarily a good thing.  Matter of fact, there are quite a few side effects that go along with all that extra stuff you keep around once your basic needs are met.  The excess clutter even has a way of taking a toll on your mental, physical, physiological, and emotional well-being.  Consider these examples and ask yourself how many you have encountered:

As May transitions into June, we are officially set to hit summer.  And that means (among other things) that it’s moving season.  According to the most recent census, almost 12% of the total United States population moves every year.  On average, families in the U.S. sell their homes about every 6 to 7 years.  One of the most popular reasons for moving is housing-related or because those moving "Wanted new or better home/apartment". Regardless of the reasons, moving from one home to another inevitably requires the need to dispose of unwanted household items.

Waste Free Wednesday

 

In honor of “Waste Free Wednesday,” we’ve put together a nice little list of common household items (plus a few bigger ones too) that people often throw away, but it would be more advantageous to recycle instead.  We preach it all the time, because it’s such a huge part of what we do.  So without further adieu, let’s get our Waste Free Wednesday on shall we?

People have a tendency to throw so much stuff away without giving it a second thought.  We’re all guilty of it at one time or another.  But aside from bigger items that could end up being worth money if you took them to be appraised the next time Antiques Roadshow comes through town, we’ve compiled a list of common things that get trashed all the time….and how you can potentially turn those items into money, instead of just more fodder for the landfill.

 

  • Scrap Metal

This one’s easy.  So many different household items are made of metal, and so many scrap yards will accept all kinds: aluminum, steel, copper….to name a few.  Got an old grill you don’t use?  Don’t trash it, take it to the scrap yard.

 

  • Cardboard boxes

Sure, most of these go straight to your recycle bin once you use them.  But did you know that there are online marketplaces that will pay you for your used boxes and then re-sell them?  Curious?  Check out boxcycle.com to find out more.

  • Electronics

We upgrade these all the time.  Computers, TVs, smartphones, tablets….we can barely keep up with technological advancements year to year.  But if you’re one of those people who needs to stay on the cutting edge, consider selling your used electronics to a site like Gazelle instead of trashing them.

  • Junk Mail

Didn’t see this one coming huh?  We all get junk mail, and we all hate it.  We toss it/recycle it without even opening it most of the time.  Well, stop that immediately.  There’s a company called the Small Business Knowledge Center that will buy your junk mail pertaining to credit, finance, mortgage, travel, and telecommunications industries.  All you have to do is sign up so they can send you a prepaid envelope to forward your junk mail with.  

  • Used Printer Cartridges

This is for all you work from home people.  Don’t trash those ink cartridges once they’re spent, save them!  When you’ve accumulated 20, send them to eCycle Group, and then get paid via check!


Making money and keeping things out of landfills….sounds a bit like a familiar business model doesn’t it?

Tossing millions of computers, TVs, and cell phones into landfills poses serious health and environmental risks. Electronic equipment contains toxic materials, including lead, cadmium, and mercury, that may leak into the soil and ground water when disposed of in landfills. In fact, the average CRT computer monitor contains four to

In our line of work it is not uncommon to come in excessive contact with "dust collectors". Yes, items in your basement that have been long forgotten since they were relegated to the deep recesses of your cave. I know that it is easy to use the "out

 

drugs web thumb

Over the past six years we here at Gone For Good have come across an overwhelming amount of furniture, antiques, junk, and random items and products during our never ending mission to recycle and serve others within our community. Everytime we experience something new or uncommon we try our best to find the most ideal way to recycle, reuse, resell, and/or dispose of those items in a sustainable way. As the political season has and will be ramping up we’re about to get hit with commercial after commercial describing each presidential hopeful.  For those who manage to survive the endless barrage of political rhetoric, they’ll also be bombarded by a whole other genre of commercial:  the there’s-a-little-pill-for-that-commercial.

 

January 13, 2016                   

Navigating Your Way through the Forest of Wood Recycling

Do you feel like you’ve started the New Year on the right path, clear of all bumps and stumps along the way?  Or, are there a couple big logs, literally, looming in your lane?  If you haven’t already done so, you need to navigate your way through the forest of wood recycling and make 2016 a clear horizon so you can see the other, more pressing challenges of 2016 head-on!   

By Raye Lynn Husmer

We live in a society which supports and celebrates self-sufficiency.  It no longer takes a village to raise a child; rather, it takes one self-contained parent possessing all the faculties and innate resources required to rear, in our minds, equally as competent children.